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Staff Profile: Dorjbal Dorjsuren

Dorjbal Dorjsuren, Ph.D.
Dorjbal Dorjsuren, Ph.D.

Research Scientist, Biology (Contractor)

Division of Pre-Clinical Innovation

National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

National Institutes of Health

E-mail Dorjbal Dorjsuren

Biography

Dorjbal Dorjsuren joined NIH in 2008, and he now works at NCATS as a research scientist on the team led by Anton Simeonov, Ph.D. Dorjsuren is responsible for designing and implementing high-throughput biochemical and cellular assays. Dorjsuren’s expertise lies in developing novel compound screening technologies, performing automated high-throughput screens, and validating potential primary hit compounds with secondary assays and mechanism-of-action studies. He received a Ph.D. in molecular biology and oncology at Kanazawa University, where he worked with Seishi Murakami, Ph.D., on the mechanism of liver carcinogenesis caused by the hepatitis B virus. Dorjsuren conducted his postdoctoral training at the National Cancer Institute, where he investigated cancer-causing gamma herpes viruses and developed the Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpes virus DNA polymerase screening assay.

Research Topics

Dorjsuren’s goal is to develop novel treatments for human diseases using high-throughput strategies by performing fully automated robotic high-throughput screening assays. He is interested in the use of small molecule probes as chemical biology tools to investigate various mechanisms of disease pathologies in the therapeutic areas of oncology, virology and parasitic diseases. Dorjsuren has developed and converted numerous cell-based and biochemical assays into a high-throughput screening format using advanced technologies. These assays include a translesion DNA polymerase assay for assessing DNA polymerase activity in vitro, high-content polymerase and endonuclease gel assays, fluorescence reporter gene assays for monitoring viral expression (vaccinia, human cytomegalovirus), fluorescent-based biochemical homogeneous endonuclease assays, and high-content cell assays for measuring endoplasmic reticulum–associated degradation.

Selected Publications