HHS Logo U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Divider arrow NIH logo National Institutes of Health Alt desc
Skip Over Navigation Links
Staff banner

Staff Profile: Andrés Dulcey

Andrés E. Dulcey, Ph.D.

Research Scientist (Contractor)

Division of Pre-Clinical Innovation

National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

National Institutes of Health

E-mail Andrés E. Dulcey

Biography

Andrés E. Dulcey is a research scientist working with Juan J. Marugan, Ph.D., at NCATS. Dulcey optimizes drug-like properties of small molecules identified through high-throughput screening collaboration programs and develops molecular probes used to investigate the pharmacological basis of disease. Before joining NCATS, Dulcey served as a postdoctoral fellow at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute on Child Health and Human Development under Vince Pozsgay, Ph.D., developing synthetic carbohydrate vaccine candidates and as a chemist at NIH’s Imaging Probe Development Center synthesizing novel imaging probes for targeting receptors, cells and tissues and for pre-clinical in vivo evaluations.

Dulcey received a B.S. in chemistry from Ohio State University, where he worked with Todd Lowary, Ph.D., on the synthesis of arabinofuranose analogs as inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Dulcey then received a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of Pennsylvania, where he worked under Virgil Percec, Ph.D., designing and synthesizing complex molecular dendrimers exhibiting biological functions.

Research Topics

Dulcey works on several collaborative endeavors in a multidisciplinary research environment, tackling metabolic disorders, central nervous system conditions, infectious diseases and autoimmune disorders, among others. He applies synthetic and medicinal chemistry as well as pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles in the design and synthesis of novel small molecules with drug-like properties. Some of Dulcey’s research interests include organic synthesis, carbohydrate chemistry, G protein–coupled receptors, functional selectivity and allosteric modulators.